[7] Similarly, the United States Carter administration's Department of State issued visas to Prime Minister Ian Smith and his ministers on separate pieces of paper rather than stamping their Rhodesian passports, which the U.S. regarded as illegal. [12] Attitudes towards Rhodesia's participation in the Davis Cup international tennis tournament were varied; having first entered in 1963, it was allowed to play up to and including 1970. your Rhodesian Brushstroke Camouflage Source. These "passports" look largely genuine, but purport to be issued by country that no longer exists, or which has changed its name.

More recently, a market has developed on the internet for "camouflage passports", false documents intended to mask a traveller's true nationality. For example, when Rhodesian politicians travelled to the United States on official business during the 1970s they were issued visas on separate pieces of paper, their passports unstamped.
Following the independence of Zimbabwe in April 1980, Zimbabwean passports came into use, though the old documents continued to be issued until stocks were exhausted. The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. For example, when Rhodesian politicians travelled to the United States on official business during the 1970s they were issued visas on separate pieces of paper, their passports unstamped. Since then, Zimbabwean passports have been issued and used by the country's citizens. That's it. [11] Following five years of absence afterwards, it returned for two years during the late 1970s, taking part in the 1975 and 1976 competitions, but thereafter did not play again under the Rhodesian name,[12] returning in 1981 as Zimbabwe.

[1], More recently, a market has developed on the internet for "camouflage passports", false documents intended to mask a traveller's true nationality. [10] Attitudes towards Rhodesia's participation in the Davis Cup international tennis tournament were varied; having first entered in 1963, it was allowed to play up to and including 1970. For example, when Rhodesian politicians travelled to the United States on official business during the 1970s they were issued visas on separate pieces of paper, their passports unstamped. [13], Rhodesian passport holders who needed to travel to other countries often ended up applying for other travel documents, including passports issued by other governments. [2] The United Kingdom and the United States occasionally permitted entry to Rhodesian passport holders, particularly blacks. With the Lancaster House Agreement of December 1979, the Bush War formally ended and the country was placed under the temporary control of Britain while fresh elections were organised and held, after which recognised independence would be granted, with the country's name shortened to Zimbabwe. These "passports" look largely genuine, but purport to be issued by country that no longer exists, or which has changed its name. These "passports" look largely genuine, but purport to be issued by country that no longer exists, or which has changed its name. Rhodesian passports were issued by the government of Rhodesia to its citizens for purposes of international travel. Because a Rhodesian passport was of little use in practice, many Rhodesian citizens obtained documents issued by other governments, most commonly British passports, which according to a 1978 report from the International Committee of the Red Cross were held by over two-thirds of the country's white population. However, some Rhodesians were able to proceed to Australia as migrants, for example 170 such persons in 1977. There were exceptions for "study and compassionate reasons" as well.

Rhodesian passports were ostensibly valid for travel by Rhodesians anywhere in the world, but in practice they were accepted by very few countries. The passports continued to be accepted by some non-UN countries, such as Switzerland, as well as a few UN members, including Portugal and South Africa, but they were not recognised as legal by most foreign powers. The dispute surrounding the passports made it difficult for many Rhodesians to travel overseas, and also impacted on Rhodesia's entry into international sports competitions, such as the Olympic Games, the FIFA World Cup, and the Davis Cup. Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea! One widely noted case involved Air Vice-Marshal Harold Hawkins, the commander of the Royal Rhodesian Air Force, who had emigrated to Rhodesia from Australia in 1946.

Rhodesian Passport: $170.00. When Frederick Crawford went to London to discuss Rhodesia's ban from the 1968 Olympics, his British passport was seized and he departed the country on an emergency travel letter; he then declared his intention to apply for a Rhodesian passport if his British passport was not returned. [14] Many others resorted to Garry Davis' World Passport, a legally ambiguous document which few authorities recognised. Would you like Wikipedia to always look as professional and up-to-date?