A meringue cake with a crisp crust and soft, marshmallow centre, topped with whipped cream and fruit. Popular in the late 19th and early 20th century.

The coat of arms of New Zealand is the heraldic symbol representing the South Pacific island country of New Zealand. Certain items of popular culture thought to be unique to New Zealand are also called "Kiwiana". Geologically, pounamu are usually nephrite jade, bowenite, or serpentinite, but the Māori classify pounamu by colour and appearance. Now rarely used, other than as a supporter on the coat of arms. Its country of origin is widely contested by Australia. Certain items of popular culture thought to be unique to New Zealand are also called "Kiwiana". "God Defend New Zealand" was adopted in 1977. Evergreen tree, producing bright yellow flowers in spring. The culture of New Zealand is essentially a Western culture influenced by the unique environment and geographic isolation of the islands, and the cultural input of the indigenous Māori people and the various waves of multi-ethnic migration which followed the British colonisation of New Zealand. An Encyclopaedia of New Zealand was an official encyclopaedia about New Zealand, published in three volumes by the Government of New Zealand in 1966. The phrase features in current historical and political discourse on race relations in New Zealand, and is widely used by Māori advocacy groups. Its design reflects New Zealand's history as a bicultural nation, with a European female figure on one side and a Māori rangatira (chief) on the other. This page was last edited on 17 October 2020, at 15:49. A European woman and a Māori chief flank the left and right sides, identifying New Zealand as a, "God Defend New Zealand" was adopted in 1977. Kiwiana are certain items and icons from New Zealand's heritage, especially from around the middle of the 20th century, that are seen as representing iconic New Zealander elements. Now rarely used, other than as a supporter on the coat of arms. All orders are custom made and most ship worldwide within 24 hours. The name derives from the kiwi, a native flightless bird, which is a national symbol of New Zealand. Popular in the late 19th and early 20th century.

This page was last modified on 8 October 2020, at 22:20.

Like other Pacific cultures, Māori society was centred on kinship links and connection with the land but, unlike them, it was adapted to a cool, temperate environment rather than a warm, tropical one. Te Ara: The Encyclopedia of New Zealand is an online encyclopedia established in 2001 by the New Zealand Government's Ministry for Culture and Heritage.

Opened in 1997, the Sky Tower is the tallest freestanding structure in the Southern Hemisphere. Until 2007, Otorohanga held a yearly 'Kiwiana Festival.'. Blooms of kōwhai are found throughout New Zealand in a diverse range of habitats. A traditional Māori war dance, now widely used by sports teams as a challenge and by schools as a tribute or honour. Australia was then known as New Holland, and so New Zealand was named after Zeeland, the other main Netherlands province.
The web-based content was developed in stages over the next several years; the first sections were published in 2005, and the last in 2014 marking its completion.

Over 30,000 images and video clips are included from thousands of contributors. The distinctly shaped executive wing of New Zealand Parliament Buildings, built in the 1970s. Certain items of popular culture thought to be unique to New Zealand are also called "Kiwiana". [13].

National symbols of New Zealand are used to represent what is unique about the nation, reflecting different aspects of its cultural life and history. The fern is usually recognisable by the silver-white colour of the under-surface of mature fronds. It comprises two main landmasses—the North Island and the South Island —and around 600 smaller islands, covering a total area of 268,021 square kilometres (103,500 sq mi). New Zealand's capital city is Wellington, and its most populous city is Auckland. The country's national rugby union team - three times world champions, and the country's best known sports team both locally and internationally.

The following lists events that happened during 1821 in New Zealand. New Zealanders, colloquially known as Kiwis, are people associated with New Zealand, sharing a common history, culture, and language.


It is recognised as the "gateway" to the Waitomo Caves and as the "Kiwiana Town" of New Zealand. The coat of arms of New Zealand is the official symbol of New Zealand. Popular in the late 19th and early 20th century. The symbols on the central shield represent New Zealand's trade, agriculture and industry, and a Crown represents New Zealand's status as a constitutional monarchy. The coat of arms of New Zealand is the official symbol of New Zealand. Otorohanga is a north King Country town in the Waikato region in the North Island of New Zealand. Pounamu are several types of hard and durable stone found in southern New Zealand. Within Māoridom, and to a lesser extent throughout New Zealand as a whole, the word Māoritanga is often used as an approximate synonym for Māori culture, the Māori-language suffix -tanga being roughly equivalent to the qualitative noun-ending -ness in English. Some believe it was given by the early Polynesian navigator Kupe, but it came into widespread use only in the late 19th centu… Evergreen tree, producing bright yellow flowers in spring. "Kiwi" is the nickname used internationally for people from New Zealand, as well as being a relatively common self-reference. These "quirky things that contribute to a sense of nationhood" include both genuine cultural icons and kitsch. The history of New Zealand (Aotearoa) dates back approximately 700 years to when it was discovered and settled by Polynesians, who developed a distinct Māori culture. He is regarded as a pioneer of the modern Māori art movement. National symbols of New Zealand are used to represent what is unique about the nation, reflecting different aspects of its cultural life and history. The commonly accepted Māori name for the country is Aotearoa (‘land of the long white cloud’). Until the First World War, the kiwi represented the country and not the people; however, by 1917, New Zealanders were also being called "Kiwis", supplanting other nicknames. Indian New Zealanders are persons of Indian origin or descent, living in New Zealand.

New Zealand was named, probably by a Dutch cartographer, some time after the Dutch explorer Abel Tasmanmade the first recorded European landfall in 1642. It appears in the Māori version of the Treaty of Waitangi, signed by the British Crown and Māori chiefs (rangatira) in 1840. ", "New Zealand Flag colors, meaning and symbolism", "Nation and government - Nationhood and identity", Nation and government - Nationhood and identity, Kiwifruit: Actinidia deliciosa In: Fruits of Warm Climates, 1987, Māori creation traditions - Common threads in creation stories: The koru, "The Impact (Economic and Otherwise) of Lord of the Rings/The Hobbit on New Zealand", https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=National_symbols_of_New_Zealand&oldid=984003465, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, The symbols on the shield represent the country's maritime trade, agriculture and industry. Nephrite jade, highly valued by Māori both physically and spiritually.

New Zealand national honours have used red ochre, black and white/silver since 1975. "God Defend New Zealand" was adopted in 1977. Te Ara means "the pathway" in the Māori language, and contains over three million words in articles from over 450 authors. A European woman and a Māori chief flank the left and right sides, identifying New Zealand as a, "God Defend New Zealand" was adopted in 1977. People of various ethnicities and national origins are citizens of New Zealand, governed by its nationality law. Toi whakairo or just whakairo (carving) is a Māori traditional art of carving in wood, stone or bone. Alsophila dealbata, synonym Cyathea dealbata, commonly known as the silver fern or silver tree-fern, or as ponga or punga, is a species of medium-sized tree fern, endemic to New Zealand.

The koru, widely used in traditional Māori art, is a stylised depiction of an unfurling silver fern frond. It is a symbol commonly associated with the country both overseas and by New Zealanders themselves. The name derives from the kiwi, a native flightless bird, which is a national symbol of New Zealand. Icons of New Zealand culture are almost as well known by New Zealanders and visitors as unofficial symbols. Following the introduction of metal tools there was a substantial increase in decorative ornamentation, particularly in wood and bone carving. Charles Royal, Te Ahukaramū (8 February 2005). New Zealand is about 2,000 kilometres (1,200 mi) east of Australia across the Tasman Sea and 1,000 kilometres (600 mi) south of the islands of New Caledonia, Fiji, and Tonga. New Zealand is an island country in the southwestern Pacific Ocean.

Icons of New Zealand culture are almost as well known by New Zealanders and visitors as unofficial symbols. Inspired designs on t-shirts, posters, stickers, home decor, and more by independent artists and designers from around the world. New Zealand's national symbol is mainly the Kiwi, which is a native and rare New Zealand Bird. Red ochre ( kokowai) has a spiritual significance in Māori … "God Defend New Zealand" "God Save the Queen". "God Save the Queen" is mostly used as the. A flag based on tino rangatiratanga was designed in 1990, and has become accepted as a national flag for Māori groups across New Zealand. It is located 53 kilometres (33 mi) south of Hamilton and 18 kilometres (11 mi) north of Te Kuiti, on the Waipa River. The national Māori flag, official since 1990, also uses these colours with attached symbolism. Until the First World War, the kiwi represented the country and not the people; however, by 1917, New Zealanders were also being called "Kiwis", supplanting other nicknames. High quality New Zealand National Symbol gifts and merchandise. National symbols of New Zealand are used to represent what is unique about the nation, reflecting different aspects of its cultural life and history. Unlike many demographic labels, its usage is not considered offensive; rather, it is generally viewed as a symbol of pride and endearment for the people of New Zealand.

Māori culture also forms a distinctive part of New Zealand culture and, due to a large diaspora and the incorporation of Māori motifs into popular culture, is found throughout the world. Edited by Dr. Alexander Hare McLintock, the parliamentary historian, and assisted by two others, the encyclopaedia included over 1,800 articles and 900 biographies, written by 359 contributing authors. Evergreen tree, producing bright yellow flowers in spring. Although sometimes the Indo-Kiwi definition has been expanded to people with mixed racial parentage with one Indian parent or grandparent, this can be controversial as it generally tends to remove the ethnic heritage or identity of the foreign parent or grandparent which may be termed as insensitive to those with mixed parentage, who tend to value both their Indian and non-Indian parents and grandparents. Wood was formed into houses, fencepoles, containers, taiaha and tool handles. Its country of origin is widely contested by Australia. The flag of New Zealand, also known as the New Zealand Ensign, is based on the British maritime Blue Ensign – a blue field with the Union Jack in the canton or upper hoist corner – augmented or defaced with four red stars centred within four white stars, representing the Southern Cross constellation. [13], Charles Royal, Te Ahukaramū (8 February 2005). Opened in 1997, the Sky Tower is the tallest freestanding structure in the Southern Hemisphere. The current version was granted by Queen Elizabeth II in 1956. Blooms of kōwhai are found throughout New Zealand in a diverse range of habitats. The current version was granted by Queen Elizabeth II in 1956.